top of page

955 26TH STREET NW

Year Built

1986

Click photo below to see full sized image.

unnamed.png

History

The northern corner of 25th Street is not included in the Historic District. It is occupied by The Griffin condominium. It was built in 1986 and designed by architect David M. Schwarz for owner Eddie Lenkin. Over the door is a commissioned 3 1/2 foot square cast bronze griffin by DC Artist John Dreyfuss.

Prior to Construction of the Griffin, the area along 26th Street was occupied by 19th century row houses that were still standing at the time of EHT/Traceries survey in 1983. No. 947 was constructed by Irish immigrant builder Peter McCartney in 1886 for owner John Irving. It was a 2 story rectangular brick building with a pronounced bay to the left, with decorative brick segmental arches crowing the door and the windows. A "variety of brick work adds charm & beauty to otherwise simple [building]."

Nos. 949 to 955 were row houses built by J.W. Serrvi for owner A.B. Hines in 1892. They were similar to the earlier McCartney building (No. 947). They were two story, two bay brick row houses with wrought iron steps leading to a raised first floor. Segmental arches were present over the windows and the motifs were carried to each of the four houses with corbelled cornices.

The corner of 26th and K Street was previously occupied by an extraordinary building (2534 K St.) built in 1889 as a brick store/dwelling. The building served as a residence for the Peter McIntyre family 1889-1920s, an apartment building, a rooming house (for male students and government workers, 1930s), a Sanitary Grocery store (predecessor to Safeway, 1930s), the law and real estate office for the Fitzgerald Company, which was involved with Foggy Bottom redevelopment (1960s-70s), an antique store (1940s), and the Jill Hinckley pottery school and store (1970s-80s).

Documents

Ownership History

Recollections

Source Material 

EHT Traceries survey 11/1983F
Carlton Knight III ,“The Architect’s Neighborly Approach: Modest Architecture” Washington Post Feb. 1, 1986

bottom of page